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RailRoad Modeling
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Sodus Point: Building a Craftsman Kit
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 06, 2012 - 12:39 PM UTC
Ferroequinologists,

Just as horses of flesh need barns and corrals and troughs and veterinarians for their care and well-being, so do horses of iron. Sodus Point was a maintenance facility on the mighty Pennsylvania RR. Sodus Point is preserved in miniature by Laser Modeling 3 (LM3) in a multi-media laser-cut kit, reviewed here: Sodus Point Welding Compound .

Come along as I try to build this impressive model set.

The first steps involve preparing the wood and mixing up AI: an alcohol and India ink stain for the wood. The scribed siding is distressed with a wire brush to add more wood grain. Then the pieces are soaked in AI. When they looked happily mildewed, I dried them in paper towels between heavy hard flat things.





(Look at that beautiful weathered wood grain on the "sprues" -- these will make great running boards atop freight cars!)



When they are dry and as flat as I can make them, I painted them for a weathered effect. The welding car is modeled after a car that outlived revenue service and was sidetracked. It is living out its life without much TLC or maintenance. The paint is peeling and fading. To simulate this I followed the kit tips and daubed on paint with a sponge. I used a chiseled painting sponge and occasionally used the sharp edge to apply paint. I mixed the superb Polly Scale acrylic paint (JPTRR Maintenance Car Ochre) with an acrylic craft paint called ‘buttercream’ to simulate yellow ravished by the sun. I mixed the Polly Scale with the craft paint because they don’t initially mix well.

Result: craft paint gobs intermingled with Polly Scale. You can see the effects:





Then I prepared the inner basswood core for the window glazing and screens. I did not remove the window plugs before soaking in AI. Result: little white burrs on both sides of the window hole. Fortunately, just a light rub from a No. 2 pencil lead darkens these.


Next, cut out the acetate windows and nylon screens. They were lazed and have burned gobbies on edges. I cut and sanded these away so they don’t impede mating the inner and outer sheathes to the inner core. Then I painted them a rust color. The screens were secured with CA. As were the window sheets.






There you have it! Next step is to sandwich the parts of the walls together. Check back soon!
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Sunday, June 24, 2012 - 02:07 AM UTC
Heck of a way to run a railroad (site), yet here's my progress report for Sodus Point. I am assembling the walls. They are a sandwich of the basswood core (with nylon screening and window acetate attached to), and exterior and interior scribed siding.

To mate the walls with the floor and roof, the wall components are staggered somewhat. The top edges are flush. It is tricky to align everything so that the window openings are aligned. I used my magnetic gluing jig to try to square things up. Using left over Uhu glue from my NOCH mine kits, the sandwich is made, and compressed with machinist squares while the Uhu cures (challenging, as the Uhu grabs tight and sets fast. I am having better luck with CA).

If you build this model, be aware that the inside wall does not cover the slots and tabs on the ends of the basswood, while the exterior walls do.



Note that although I abutted the core and external siding ends flush, the windows openings did not align. This may not be a problem as each opening will receive a styrene frame and sill later.



Pictured are the sandwiched ends. The last two show to good effect the staggered sandwiching of the three components.

I initially spot-glued them, then followed up with thin CA along the edges, letting capillary action do its magic. Then weights. The assemblies seem nice and sturdy.
p40f20
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Ohio, United States
Joined: June 24, 2006
KitMaker: 20 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 1 posts
Posted: Friday, July 20, 2012 - 02:03 PM UTC
I love this. Can't wait to see the finished building.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 01:05 PM UTC
Hi Mark,

Thanks for the support!

Here's another installment. The walls are all done except for the window frames. Plenty of left over siding, too!


That wonderful external siding of fine wood grain is great but be careful stressing it. The wire brush broke it in places. No big deal, as putting it back together just makes it look like real siding that has been in the weather too long -- exactly what this kit models!

I continued to sandwich the internal and external walls over the basswood core per the instructions, using both Uhu glue and CA. The clear sheet and screen makes the internal wall bow out; pressure is required to mash it smooth while the glue sets.

Now that the walls are nearly complete, we start on the underframe. This piece is thick piece of wood with deck boards, structure guides, and other detail laser etched into the surface. The first step is to attach the plastic bolsters.

Next attach the “I” beam center sills. These are milled wood. And badly warped.

Happily, a brief soak in water and an overnight press between my metal gluing jig and a cardboard box straightened it out. I cut it and attached the two beams between the bolsters. Next, get into your bag of color-coded scale lumber. Lengths of 4 X 4s are cut to form side sills from bolster to bolster. Then six intermediate sills are cut and strung between the bolsters, and two short pieces extend from the bolsters to the end of the deck. Between those parts are added a pair of 2 x 3s. The ends outside of the bolsters are complete with the adding of milled wood U channels which you have to cut at an angle.



The final touch to the underframe is adding a quartet of thick laser cut crossbearers are attached across the stringers.





By now the wall assemblies’ cements should be cured and I’ll add the styrene window framing. Tune in soon for the update. Thanks for looking!
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 04:30 PM UTC
Hi Gang,

Time to dust off Sodus Point and resume the build. Recently I added the styrene windows.


Check back soon for more!
velotrain
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: December 23, 2010
KitMaker: 384 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 17 posts
Posted: Thursday, February 21, 2013 - 10:22 AM UTC
Fred -

I'm seriously sleep deprived and haven't had time to go through the whole build log, but a few initial thoughts.

A razor saw is also useful for distressing. I haven't done it, but some guys put in knot holes - this can be overdone.

I don't know why, but have heard/read that 90% isopropyl is better.

For those who haven't used "AI", add only a few drops of ink to start (or even one) and test it on the "sprues". You can always add more, but it's tough to subtract.

Also, I've done this with acrylic paint, but some colors don't mix well - probably based on the particular coloring agents, and this may vary between brands. The benefit vs. paint is that you still have the wood grain - if you want it.

Given the name of the kit, builders might want to consider installing a welding circuit inside. Several companies make these, but a few are only an intermittent white light, while those from Circuitron have both yellow and blue bulbs - I believe with separate timing controls for each.

Charles
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Friday, March 15, 2013 - 04:21 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Given the name of the kit, builders might want to consider installing a Several companies make these, but a few are only an intermittent white light, while those from Circuitron have both yellow and blue bulbs - I believe with separate timing controls for each.



Hi Charles,

LM3 does include a welding circuit inside.

Good ideas with the prep of the wood.
KoSprueOne
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Myanmar
Joined: March 05, 2004
KitMaker: 3,780 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 318 posts
Posted: Friday, October 03, 2014 - 02:07 PM UTC
Whoa, I must have just found this or ai would've commented earlier.
That under carriage is very detail impressive. I've never built one of these kits but it looks interesting




md72
#439
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Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
KitMaker: 4,475 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 28 posts
Posted: Friday, October 03, 2014 - 02:47 PM UTC
Neat stuff, I ought to try it some day.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Saturday, October 04, 2014 - 12:33 PM UTC
Hi KS1, Mark,

This has been a very fun model to work on. I plan to make another blog installment soon.
Giovanni1508
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Napoli, Italy
Joined: April 17, 2014
KitMaker: 652 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 2 posts
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 08:08 PM UTC

Hi Frederick,

Very interesting and useful how to manage the weathering of wooden walls, thanks !

md72
#439
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
KitMaker: 4,475 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 28 posts
Posted: Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 07:34 AM UTC
Fred, I've seen that square jig before but I've never used one. How well does it work. Are those sandwich magnets true (i.e. all edges square)?
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,469 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 659 posts
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 02:36 AM UTC
Hi Mark,

The jig works very well. I am happy with it although a side is not an exact 90-degree bend.

The sandwich magnets are somewhat disappointing. One side is affixed to the magnet and has never come off. The other side broke away on all of them. Micro Mark said to glue them back and I did, but some came loose again. Here's what I wrote:

The eight included magnets hold well. They will not break your fingers snapping to the jig, yet they hold tight. Tight enough that repositioning them for fine work is tricky. Not all magnets hold as powerfully as the others. The sliding side plate on each allows some adjusting to meet specific fits. I haven't needed that feature.

Review: http://kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=Reviews&file=index&req=showcontent&id=7679

md72
#439
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: November 05, 2005
KitMaker: 4,475 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 28 posts
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 10:18 AM UTC
Thanks Fred. If I get serious about some pending RR projects I may need to get one.