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Armor/AFV: Modern - USA
Modern Armor, AFVs, and Support vehicles.
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M198 “PREDATOR” A Btry 3-162 FA – Yauco
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,388 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 04:25 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Just got in the Verlinden M109 equipment kit...


It has what looks like a propellant charge (with Live Resin PASGT helmet for scale)...






those powder canisters look like green bag canisters. Seems like there was (are?) two full sets of charges in each can. White bag is shorter and about two or three inches bigger in diameter.

Take no offense, but the powder bags look like nothing I ever used (plastic). The bags are actually packed pretty tight, and the red end is very blunt with the red flash pad being proud by about a quarter inch (same for white bag). When we cut charges, we'd hold onto the very top ribbons and simply push out what we didn't want. Then while still holding onto the ribbons we would simply spin it till it was tight. Then tuck the remaining ribbons into the side. Quicker and once in the breech nobody cares is you tie it or glue it. After the mission, the left overs are dumped away from the gun

Honestly; we never had a lot of left over powder unless you could almost see where you were shooting out in front of you. Yet on some LZ's we'd fill a pick up truck daily (six guns). Just not the norm. Charge sevens were the norm from five klicks out to max range.

Does (or did) the M198 use aiming stakes? I'd think so, but I'm also real old.
gary
amoz02t
#192
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Kentucky, United States
Joined: November 25, 2009
KitMaker: 1,383 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 02:40 AM UTC
https://forums.kitmaker.net/t/m198-predator-a-btry-3-162-fa-yauco/1027

"Does (or did) the M198 use aiming stakes? I'd think so, but I'm also real old.
gary"

Thanks Gary! The aiming sticks and ramrods are included in the model kit attached inside the legs. I am sure Gary Shively (GazzaS), Gino (HeavyArty), Rob Skipper (18Bravo), Rod Rendon (Bravo114) and others on this forum that were on M198 crews could comment better than I. Many here have also mentioned the M1A2 INFINITY AIMING COLLIMATOR. The folks on this forum have provided a wealth of insight and knowledge that has been wonderful.

Gary your comment on twisting the ribbons up is interesting as that puzzled me as to how a lot of loose stuff got shoved in the breech quickly. I will post a figure on the new forum at the link (as the old Gallery feature always seems overwhelmed lately with the transfer). Thanks- Stuart

https://forums.kitmaker.net/t/m198-predator-a-btry-3-162-fa-yauco/1027
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,388 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 06:23 AM UTC
[quote] https://forums.kitmaker.net/t/m198-predator-a-btry-3-162-fa-yauco/1027

"Does (or did) the M198 use aiming stakes? I'd think so, but I'm also real old.
gary"

Thanks Gary! The aiming sticks and ramrods are included in the model kit attached inside the legs. I am sure Gary Shively (GazzaS), Gino (HeavyArty), Rob Skipper (18Bravo), Rod Rendon (Bravo114) and others on this forum that were on M198 crews could comment better than I. Many here have also mentioned the M1A2 INFINITY AIMING COLLIMATOR. The folks on this forum have provided a wealth of insight and knowledge that has been wonderful.

Gary your comment on twisting the ribbons up is interesting as that puzzled me as to how a lot of loose stuff got shoved in the breech quickly. I will post a figure on the new forum at the link (as the old Gallery feature always seems overwhelmed lately with the transfer). Thanks- Stuart

https://forums.kitmaker.net/t/m198-predator-a-btry-3-162-fa-yauco/1027

Actually; I like the way the powder bags were made in the picture better than what were used. Not much difference, but better labeled nd the ribbons are better. I've shot WWII, Korean War, and nearly new powders, and there's little difference till what I see in the photo. I took care of the ammo and powder for our gun. I also cut every charge when needed (only one guy on each gun did this). I would lay it on a platform we built that layed on the ground, but the plywood stayed off the ground as we shot in the rain too much! The section chief (when we had one) would hand the powder to me in such away that my right hand covered the red flash pad. I don't have the time to look and dodge the ramming staff plus keep eye contact with Randy (AG). It's also the Chief's job to verify that the powder charge is right. Mine was so stupid that I doubt he knew. We also shot a few "contact fire missions. With these your shooting too close to friendlies to be comfortable, and shoot a certain powder lot and projo lot number. It's his job to see your using the contact lot numbers (honestly he didn't know we had one for almost a month).

Most folks think of combat on a sunny afternoon, but boy are the wrong. It's pretty much an anytime thing. We called it working the night shift, as we started to see things pick up about ten at night and often keep at it till the sun came up. Yes we'd catch somebody snatching ZZ's in the afternoon and give them a wake up call. But for every round we shot in daylight, we shot twenty at night. Atop each aiming stake we taped a flashlight. One with a red lens. and the other green. when you got a fire mission, somebody ran back there and turned the lights on.
gary
trickymissfit
Joined: October 03, 2007
KitMaker: 1,388 posts
RailRoad Modeling: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 06:39 AM UTC
The folks that are certified with the collumator are normally the survey crew. We didn't have the tools, and didn't want them anyway. Our Battalion didn't have one either. That job fell to a request for Division to send the crew out as we were setting howitzers. They were usually on the ground as we were setting the first gun. Who's idea? I cannot say, and there must have been several crews as the Division had all of I-Corp, and that meant every gun in every unit.
Everytime the stakes are tampered with, you must register the gun again (rules of the game). If you change the scope, you re-register again. If the gun is out of the pit, you get to register all over again. Guess it's better than killing the wrong folks. I can truthfully say that no gun in my unit ever fired out unless something broke (happens more often than you might think). A good Chief, loader, and sometimes the AG will usually catch something wrong during recoil, and not allow another round thru the barrel. The AG can't be blamed as he's looking away and in his own zone.
gary